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Author Topic: Converts ( Revert Muslims ) Around the World  (Read 40691 times)

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Converts ( Revert Muslims ) Around the World
« on: July 09, 2007, 10:16:56 AM »
 :salam:


And give glad tidings (O Muhammad)

 unto those who believe and do good works;


 that theirs are Gardens underneath which rivers flow

[Qur’an 2:25]


Who says there is never any good news ?



http://thetruereligion.org/modules/xfsection/index.php?category=4



People are  becoming Muslims   despite the hostile  media propaganda against Islam.



 :alhamdolillah:


 :mashallah:



American Indian
Australia
Austria



Bangladesh
Brazil
Brunei




Canada
China
Czechoslovakia




Denmark


Ecuador
England



Finland
France



Germany Hawaii



Holland
Hong Kong
Hungary




Iceland
India
Indonesia
Ireland
Italy
Iran





Japan


Kuwait



Latin America



New Zealand
Norway Persia




Philipines

Poland





Russia



Scotland
Singapore
South Africa
Spain
Sweden




Taiwan
Tanzania


Unknown


U.S.A




Vietnam

General Converts' Assoc. of Singapore




Islam OnLine from Europe



Islam Our Choice



Converts to Islam


Bosanske Islamske Pagina Portugal



Pagina Italiano



Malay Website


Indonesian Website



Turkish Website




http://www.themodernreligion.com/convert/convert_websites.htm


 :mashallah:
« Last Edit: August 22, 2007, 09:49:52 AM by Muslim Woman »
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recitation: http://quran.jalisi.com
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COLLECTED STORIES OF PEOPLE WHO EMBRACED ISLAM FROM A-Z
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2007, 10:39:59 AM »
 :salam:



The Sword of Islam:

ARE YOU STILL IN DOUBT ABOUT THE POPULAR NOTION THAT ISLAM WAS SPREAD BY SWORD?


EXAMINE THE FOLLOWING FACTS AND YOU WILL COME TO BELIEVE




http://www.geocities.com/embracing_islam
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My Father is greater than I.  Bible, John 14:28

Christ will never be proud to reject to be a slave to God ...( 4: 172 )



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Teresita converted to Islam? What got into her?".
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2007, 10:53:25 AM »
 :salam:





My Story:

From Christianity to Islam


by Sr. Khadija Zafar

No one could have ever imagined me make such a decision! Even in my wildest dreams, looking back five years, I could not have foresaw this turn of events. Those who knew me uttered in disbelief, "Teresita converted to Islam? What got into her?".




 My decision devastated my parents and my entire family -- all of whom were devoted Catholics from the Philippines --


and caused me to loose all my friends. However, Allah (Subhanawataala), Al'Alim (The All-Knowing), Al-Wali (The Protecting Friend) and Al-Jami'(The Gatherer) had opened my heart and made me realize that I had been worshipping a false deity;

There was simply no turning back. This is the story of my conversion to Islam.




After 11 years of marriage which ended in 1992, my life was filled with black clouds. Everything seemed to be falling apart. Raising a young boy all alone was not easy and I often sought help of our Lord.




 I tried to distract myself by being around friends, spending time in the mall with my son, or just keeping busy at work; but, that did not change my feeling of loneliness and loss.




Then, one day I met and befriended an Afghan family I spent most of my free time with them and became acquainted with their culture and their delicious food. Yet, what I found most intriguing was their devotional worship and belief in God and His Messenger, Prophet Muhammad (saw).

As a firm Christian, I furiously debated with them and stated that Christianity was the only way to salvation, but they insisted that Islam is the way to everlasting paradise. We spent hours discussing the merits of one religion over another and at the end of these friendly debates, we felt exhausted and reached nowhere. Finally, I decided to study Islam for myself and understand the message of the religion which instigated such devoted faith from my friends.

I obtained an English translation of Qur'an and began reading through the chapters of the Book. To my amazement, I was unable to stop reading and went on for hours. I found the Qur'an very simple, clear, and easy to understand. I began to experience an overwhelming sense of upliftment and rejuvenation; it was simply wonderful. It felt almost like Qur'an was alive and speaking directly to me. I experienced an inner change and knew that things would never be the same.

A few days later, I visited my Afghan friends with my copy of the Qur'an and told them of my intention of becoming a Muslim. Well, knowing now, the first pillar of Islam i shahadah (to proclaim belief in God and His Messenger) which I sincerely uttered "La llaha Ilala, Muhammada Rasul Allah", in their presence. They were all so happy about my decision that even Grandmother (as I called her ) burst into tears.

Now what? Or what was next? I had no idea how to practice Islam. Due to distance, going over to my Afghan friends to learn Islam was not very convenient. I checked Out the phone book and looked for a mosque where I could get more information and be religiously involved. I found one with an Islamic Library and paid it a visit. The librarian helped me find books that were suitable for beginners and put me in touch with a sister -- also from the Philippines -who patiently helped me with my questions. My first Qur'an was now replaced by an Arabic/English text. I started to learn to pray in English and slowly memorized them in Arabic. Then, I started wearing hijab (head scarf) and changed my manner of dressing. Gradually, I began paying attention to the halal (allowed) and haram (forbidden) food.

Seeing the change for the better in me, my son also declared his shahadah and (alhamdullilah) tries to be a good Muslim, the best he could possibly be at the age of nine. We started getting involved with our local masjid's activities and I obtained more Islamic books and literature which we have studied at home. Since then, I have tried to convey the message of Islam to as many non-Muslims as I can; some of them, even, have become interested and embraced the religion of Truth.

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Parthenon/4482/article46.htm
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My Father is greater than I.  Bible, John 14:28

Christ will never be proud to reject to be a slave to God ...( 4: 172 )



prepared by faith :)

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Through Zainab's Eyes: Being a New Muslim
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2007, 05:36:50 PM »
 :salam:



By  Zainab Morrow
 
 
 
In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.




I converted to Islam in January 2007. This personal journal's main goal is to document my growth in my new faith. I sincerely hope to be able to help other new Muslims in their journey.


 
 
Since my conversion, I have attempted to attend Friday Prayer at the masjid as often as possible. I have met several new sisters and brothers who are always willing to help by answering my questions or issues that have come up in my daily life. 
 

Learning Self-Discipline

 

I think the most difficult aspect of this journey is to ensure that I integrate my faith into my daily life such as the five daily prayers. I am still struggling to incorporate prayers as I am still learning the various stages of the five daily prayers.

 

However, I have taken some important steps to improve recitation of the prayers. I use a book accompanied by a tape and practice over and over again. I expect, in sha' Allah, that by the end of the summer, I will be able to pray correctly. 

 

One of the most important lessons that I have learned in Islam, so far, is self-discipline. Islam is a complete way of life and it can be a struggle for new converts to adapt. It's important to take one step at a time.

 

I know that right after my conversion, I wanted to fully integrate all aspects of Islam in my life. I was somewhat impatient and wanted to accomplish everything perfectly. Islam, however, emphasizes patience and balance into one's life.

 

Modest Clothes

 

Another aspect that has changed since I converted to Islam is wearing modest clothes. I feel that I have always tried to dress simply and decently. However, summer presents a challenge to dress modestly according to what is prescribed in the Qur'an and Sunnah.

 

I have been slowly changing my wardrobe and now feel more comfortable to cover appropriately when I am in public. I would not feel at ease if I were not covered properly when meeting new people. So far, I have not had any negative comments about my way of dressing up.

 

I feel people tend to be more respectful when one is dressed appropriately. I truly believe that modesty is better for interaction between men and women. There is no hidden agenda. I want to be recognized for who I am, but not attract unwanted attention to my physical appearance.

 

Unfortunately, women are often perceived as a commodity in our time. One has just to look in magazines and newspapers of how women are portrayed in advertisements. Very discouraging sometimes!

 

I have chosen to talk about hijab as a separate topic as it has stirred a lot of controversies. I started wearing hijab on an occasional basis, as I still don't feel comfortable to wear it all the time. I wear my headscarf going to work and back home. I don't wear it at work. I am still afraid to get negative attention.

 

I know it takes courage and a strong iman (faith) to achieve this goal. In sha' Allah, I will continue to pray to Allah and ask for guidance in this endeavour. I am fully aware that a lot of countries have banned the hijab in public places and put a lot of sisters in a very uncomfortable position. I believe that a lot of public awareness needs to be done in our world to make people understand that it is Allah's command.
 
 
 
http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1183484274455&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout
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Christ will never be proud to reject to be a slave to God ...( 4: 172 )



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posting on behalf of a bro who is serving in a prison in Scotland
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2007, 11:35:03 AM »
 :salam:




Assalaamu'alaikum!


I am posting this story on behalf of a brother who is now serving his term in a prison in Scotland and hence has no access to the internet.




 He is a brother who takes his belief very seriously and looks forward to correspond with other brothers and sisters for discussions, exchange opinions and ideas. I hope this story would attract attention of visitors of your web site to befriend this sincere brother.

- Jamaludin Yaakob





MY JOURNEY TO ISLAM



In September 4 1993 I began a journey that was a childhood dream. I left my home city of Aberdeen, Scotland at 4.10 p.m. with the intention of driving my camper van all the way to Goa, India, and back. Before I undertook this journey I spent a lot of time reading on the countries, customs, peoples and religions which at the very least could give me a basic understanding of the how I should re-act when arriving upon each place.




Although the diversity of the peoples was a task to take on board, it was the diversity of religions that stuck most in my mind. There seemed to be for me an excitement about Islamic countries, which kept coming to my thought.





The journey went well with the exception of a few mechanical problems throughout Eastern Europe. The first Islamic country I was to reach was Turkey. Although I had been there before, I had never been to Istanbul.



I was tired and needed rest. As one would do, I left my camper in a campsite and spent the next three weeks ad-hoc travelling through the centre of the city to see the sites.



On what was to be my last day in Istanbul I visited the Blue Mosque and the Pink Mosque [probably the Aya Sofia -MSA-USC.]. This, my brothers and sisters, was to be my introduction to the one and true religion of Al-Islam.




It was a Friday, and as I recall during 'Asr prayer no one (from the tourists) was allowed in the Pink Mosque. Due to my inquisitiveness I got firstly lost inside the mosque and secondly found myself locked in standing at the back watching the wonderful event of 'Asr prayer unfolding before my eyes.




I feel I can never quite express clearly what happened next except to say that I felt drawn, numb and very hot all at the same time. Unwittingly I remembered thinking that this was really for me without questioning why or what this religion was all about.



I knew the basic belief was that there was only one God. I believed that all my life anyway. The prayer had finished and all were on their way out. A brother approached me. I felt embarrassed as I apologised for being there when I should not. He smiled and assured me that it was all right.





After leaving the mosque, I went on a walk about heading towards the harbour area. I was standing looking in a window when I felt a presence behind me. I turned around to see the same man I met in the mosque; again he smiled. He told me to wait a moment as he went downstairs in the shop. When he appeared again a few moments later, he handed me a plastic bag and said "Is this what you have been looking for brother?"



 As I looked in the bag there was a translation of the Holy Qur'an in English. This was when an amazing thing happened. I looked up to thank him but he was gone. The strange thing was that there was no side road, alley or lane for him to simply disappear. Until this day I have never figured out where he had gone.



The journey re-commenced the next day, heading towards Eastern Turkey. I began to read the Qur'an in the evening and felt drawn to visit mosques route. Every time I met Muslim people they were forever inviting me to their homes for meals, etc. Their politeness and good character was what I have encountered before. My head was full of emptiness waiting to be filled with knowledge and I constantly asked questions about Islam. I somehow felt that I had found something that was always there but did not know how to find it and what it was.





Iran was to be the same. The more I travelled the more I felt drawn to the mosques and the company of the people.


 There was something distinctive about how the people were. At first I couldn't put my finger on it. I came from the West where I had been nurtured into a set of beliefs, values and attitude. The attitude seemed hard to shake off. The attitude that I matter, I am indispensable, I will stand on who I need to, so I may get to the top. Who is God? Does it matter? Money and prestige is more important, is it not? I felt a constant battle as I came from there, but I somehow felt I belonged here.




All the way through Iran I never felt intimidated, in fact, quite the opposite. If I had taken all the many offers of meals, accommodation, etc., I fear that I would still be there, and I would have gotten into trouble with the authorities. My visa was for one week only.

The next country was Pakistan. Here was where things got even better. The people were quite at ease and seemed happy to answer my non-stop questions on Islam. I visited more mosques. I was in more houses in Pakistan than I had probably ever been at home.




Another thing that I have always believed in before embracing Islam was pre-destination. Others may call it fate. This had led me to the next encounter of life with the Muslim people. My windscreen had broken and I ended up searching Quetta for a new one.



I was directed to Tradesmen Street. There was where I met Muhammad, a motor body repairer. He kindly let me stay in his lock-up yard for five days until he could locate a windscreen.



Everyday without fail he I ate at his house or he brought me food. He took me to meet the headmasters of both a public and a private school. He refused point blank that I should put my hand in my pocket to buy anything. He told me stories of the Prophet (p.b.u.h.) and other Islamic issues. At times I found it difficult to contain my emotions. I could not believe the hospitality I was receiving.

One occasion sticks in my mind which left me in tears and astounded. I was in Muhammad's house for lunch. There was his family there including around thirteen children. While I taught them a Scottish nursery rhyme Muhammad videotaped us together. Within minute the children who spoke no English, mastered it. When I was entering my van I heard some commotion at the end of the street. There, there were around one hundred children running towards me singing the Scottish nursery rhyme. I was surrounded as the tears ran from my cheeks with joy. It was so beautiful. Here was a stranger in a strange land and they wanted nothing from me except just to stay a little bit longer. I had to go. The following day I visited the local mosque and said my good bye with regret.

On the road to the Pakistani/Indian border I continued to read the Qur'an and still question why these people were being so nice to me but wanted nothing in return. Strange indeed.

As I said before, I was coming from the West where, in the material sense, they have everything. There was me travelling through a land with a house on wheels while around me so many people were living in squalor. If you have never had nothing you do not know what it's like, or, from my point of view, I had never experienced nothing.

My next encounter showed me the simplicity of man in relation to our Creator, Allah (s.w.t.). As I drove the Sind region in the desert I began to become anxious to find a place off the road to park for the evening. Suddenly I came upon a simple house of clay in the middle of nowhere. I approached the house and knocked on the door. An old man answered. I said "Assalaam Alaikom", he replied in kind. I asked if it was ok to park for the night? He spoke no English but acknowledged what I meant.

He invited me for tea. Immediately I became consciously aware of the simplicity of his dwelling. There was nothing which did not have a use, and everything was to a bare minimum. As I recalled the items, there was a staff carpet, a copy of al-Qur'an, a pot and a water skin. We sat on the carpet and drank tea. As he moved to the window, he left without warning with the water skin and a mat in hand. After a good five minutes had passed, I went outside. What I saw next I could only describe as 'the day the world stopped.' As the sun dropped out of the sky below the horizon, there was complete silence. The man in front of me dropped to his knees in total obedient worship to our Creator, a memory that lasts with me until this day.

I made it to India, visited more mosques and made it all the way back unscathed. I thought the people back home had changed, they had not, but I had.

It is so easy to allow yourself to be consumed by the method rather than being the method. Please allow me to elaborate. While in the East, I had accommodation, money and for once in my life, simplicity, empathy and understanding. It is not that I don't have them now. It's simply a different game with different rules and players. I tend to call it the reverse process. In simple terms, to the wonderful creations in the East, God is the important factor. It was to be my downfall back here in the West, trading god for money, or you may call it materialism. It seems easy to say now but for me anything with the word 'ISM' attached should be avoided at all costs.

No! I still had not embraced Islam. Although conscious of what I had learned, I put it on the back burner. The quest for me, which seemed more important, was accommodation, job, flat, and car. All of these don't grow on trees and, really how money becomes available never really mattered. I couldn't find a proper job. My wife who had been my constant travelling partner became just as disillusioned as I did. We had only been married a short time and even getting married to each other was ever shorter on three and a half-month. We couldn't get work; we were tired of travel and extremely tired of each other.

As things got progressively worse as we could not find work or accommodation, things were getting desperate. My wife found an advertisement in the local paper asking for a sauna receptionist. In our naivete we both believed that a Sauna was in fact a Sauna. At the same time she got the job, I got offered some work dealing and running drugs. The sauna turned out to be a front for prostitution and it was not long before my wife decided to swap answering the telephone for the red light. We both loved the money, we both became drugs users and all seemed fantastic.

This was to be short lived. It tore us apart. We were in a web where there seemed no way out.



On the one hand we needed the money to feed our cocaine habit. On the other hand, I got sick of drugs, money, prostitution, in fact, everything. We kept the company of like-minded characters that helped feed the desire for self-gratification. I tried so hard to get off the drugs.



 In the mean time I tried to get my wife off the prostitution. She seemed by now to love the money more than me. I would sit for many hours staring at this accumulating amount of money before my eyes with total disdain. Little did I realise that all was about to change - first for the worst.



Two weeks before 15 April 1996 two things happened simultaneously. The first thing happened after an encounter to the library. I took a book out on loan called "The Basics of Islam". Inside I found what one says when taking the Shahadah. I was lonely, desperate and searching for the right way. I had no one in this strange city to witness me taking the Shahadah. I therefore had no choice. I took my Shahadah bearing witness to Allah (s.w.t.) four times. I took the piles of money and put it in a jack in a cupboard. I flushed the remaining drugs in the toilet. I felt alive for the first time in a long time, although short lived.

My wife who had become a stranger to me arrived back that evening. I told her of the day's events. This was to be the final acclaim. We spoke little over the next two weeks. I had my plan set that I was going back east. In all this confusion we both plotted a terrible crime and the end result would be we would go together east. Everybody says I am innocent. I was set up, etc. etc. I am not going to say this at all: I am guilty of committing a horrible crime and the consequence of my action has led me serving a life sentence. My wife? She got off and now we are divorced, thank God!

I have now served three years of my sentence and expect to serve a further seven or eight years. You may well remember earlier that I said everything is pre-ordained. I have questioned on many occasions as to how did I end up here. The story says it all. Nevertheless, brothers and sisters, everything has a reason. One might ask what have you done with your time in prison? What is the future of your life? What are your hopes, dreams and aspirations?

Well, I think it goes like this. No man can run riot through the land without taking responsibility for his actions and I feel it is better to be punished in this life than in the hereafter.




When I first came to prison I was in Soughton Jail, Edinburgh. After being processed where all details were asked for, one of the questions was what religion are you? I replied Islam. I was immediately given a Muslim diet and allowed to go to the Muslim meetings where brothers from outside came to the prison fortnightly.




 I recalled the first meeting as I walked into the room I held my head in shame. I couldn't stop saying why did I do that. I wept as the brothers gave me support. I by my actions created not just one victim but so many.



 My victim's family, friends, work associates, etc. have all been affected by my thoughtless actions. I have seen my father turned grey, my mother on anti-depression tablets and my brother too.

I will probably never ever know the real impact of my crime upon my victim, nor do I ever expect forgiveness. I am deeply sorry and ashamed of my actions.

One of the brothers in Edinburgh said to me 'you can't change the past, you can only hope to attain to be a better person in the future.' I took my Shahadah again that evening this time in front of witnesses, back in 1996.

The easy part, which may seem the hardest part, is getting accustomed to nothingness and solitude.




That is one thing prison does for a man. It gives you time, plenty of it, to think. My first reaction was to think of what I had lost; not only family, friends, my respect and all of that "ISM' materialism.





Soon I lost the need for materialism. As I sit here now in the concrete tomb, I exchange my coat of materialism for spiritualism. I have embraced Islam fully, slowly, but surely. I am building up a new set of moral and ethical values. I pray five times daily as prescribed in Islam and beg Allah (s.w.t.) for forgiveness.





What have I done with my time you may ask? I have undertaken a home study course in Islamic Studies which consists of twenty booklets on various Islamic subjects, which on completion leads to five O' grades or GCSES. I have undertaken the first year of a degree course in Arabic and Islamic Studies. I read the Qur'an and the Ahadeeth of the Holy Prophet (s.a.w.) daily.




 I get immeasurable support from regular visits from the brothers from the Aberdeen Mosque. Why all these you may ask? Well, I believe in Allah (s.w.t.), I believe that good can overrule bad and only through the straight path of Islam can this be achieved.



I want to be an asset to society when I eventually leave the prison, inshaallah. I hope that I may have obtained my degree in Arabic and Islamic Studies by then so as I may undertake da'awah work and hopefully get a job teaching Islamic subjects.

My short-term objective is that I may be able to obtain some correspondence with Muslims world wide in the hope that I may be able to give support and hopefully receive some too. My final hope is that I may be able to get another chance of marriage. So, if any of you out there would be interested in correspondence and/or marriage, you can contact me at the following address.

Yusuf Muhammad Ansari
Reg. No 26202
H.M. Prison
Peterhead AB42 6YY
Scotland

May Allah (s.w.t.) grant you all success in this life and in the life Hereafter, Ameen.

My short resume:

Name            : Yusuf Muhammad Ansari
Age             : 38

Height          : 5' 7"
Weight          : 11.7 stone



Appearance      : Round face, beard, short hair
Current Status  : Life sentence prison



Qualifications  : English GCSE, Information Technology 1 + 2,
                  Word Processing, Maths, 5 GCSE Islamic Studies,
                  currently undertaking Degree course in Arabic
                  and Islamic Studies.




Nationality     : British
Caucasian       : White
Marital Status  : Divorced
Children        : 1 daughter (no access or visiting right)


Previous
Employment      : Oil rigs offshore (6 & 1/2 years)
                : Helicopter landing officer
                : Derrickman



                : Self employed house restorer (5 years)
Sincerely yours
Yusuf Muhammad Ansari
Aug. 3rd, 1999


http://www.geocities.com/embracing_islam/ansari.html
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My Father is greater than I.  Bible, John 14:28

Christ will never be proud to reject to be a slave to God ...( 4: 172 )



prepared by faith :)

recitation: http://quran.jalisi.com
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My Path to Islam-- An Islam-Australia Publication
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2007, 11:46:50 AM »
 :salam:





Abu Bakr’s Way To Islam

 

The following is the true account of an Australian revert taken from the honours thesis of Sister Tuba Boz.


 His name is Abu Bakr, and while his name, like many of those of his fellow-reverts, is chosen for its meaning and its nearness to some aspect of Islam, or that of the life of the Prophet of Arabia, Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him), his story is truly that of an Australian young man with all his Australianism intact. 




And though he, himself, does not wish to be seen as other than a Muslim, it is, for fellow-Australians, encouragement and living proof of the Qur’anic ayat:

 

“ O mankind We created you from a single (pair) of a male and a female,

And made you into nations and tribes,

That ye may know each other, Not that ye may despise (each other).

Verily the most honoured of you in the Sight of Allah

Is (he who is) the most righteous of you.

And Allah has full knowledge

And is well acquainted (with all things).”

Surah 49:13

 

If one had told Abu Bakr earlier, that he would one day become a Muslim, his reply would most probably have been, “Naah! No way!!!”



for like many Australians his perception of Muslims was that they were terrorists. However, there is no accounting for the Mercy and Graciousness of Allah who leads to His Path those whom He wills from all peoples upon the earth; and Abu Bakr was to find this in due course.



 

When asked what had triggered his search to find the true meaning of life, for that was the primary aim of his quest, his response was this: “There were a couple of things. It was the year my parents said they were going to separate. It was not the year they formally divorced, but it was the year my Dad moved out of the house. I went a little off the rails. I (even) had trouble with the police.. . . I was drinking a lot.” It may be seen that this was a painful time for this young man. This was to be further compounded, for it was in this year that one of his friends died. Of this event he said: “That led me to think, ‘There’s my mate. He just died, and he is only eighteen years old! Is he just worm food?’ You know what I mean. That’s when I started relating it to my life, thinking, ‘If I died tomorrow what would it matter? What would it matter except to the few who know me among the billions on this Earth?’ So I started thinking, ‘No! There has to be more. There has to be more than just this!’”

 

It was with these questions in mind that Abu Bakr commenced his journey, looking to religion for the meaning of existence. He describes his experiences in this way:

 

“First, I mean, logically, I’m an Aussie, so I went straight to Christianity, and I thought I’d have that fish sticker on the back of my car, and “I love Jesus”. I was thinking I’d go buy them and see if they did something for my parking fine!” his waggish sense of humour bubbling to the fore. Then seriously he explains, “Honestly I went through all the (Christian) religions; well not all the religions, but the ones I had access to I investigated. Christianity, including Catholicism, I investigated quite a bit. But the problem was I just couldn’t find the answer. While they were all nice, I couldn’t sit there and say, ‘This is the religion for me!’ and ‘This sounds beautiful!’”

 

His search continued:

“I looked at Hinduism when I was working in a service station with some Hindu friends. We had conversations all the time. We didn’t argue because we were pretty good friends. One would say, ‘You have to believe in this god about this, and this god of that.’ I would go, ‘Come on man! What if they argue?’  He was not to know it, but his argument was one already mentioned in the Qur’an: “Allah hath not chosen any son, nor is there any god along with Him; else would each god have assuredly championed that which he created, and some of them would assuredly have overcome others. Glorified be Allah above all that they allege.” Surah 23:91

 

“Then I looked at Judaism. Again it didn’t get me in the way that I thought it would!”

“However, what started to get me was Buddhism. I thought, ‘This is really nice you know!’ But nowhere

could I read or see that Buddha was actually talking about himself.  Not (other than) as a person that you

follow - not as a deity! And this was a religion. “So you know what I mean, it was just a nice way to be. It’s

not ‘This is the purpose of why you are here’.  And while it was nice I thought, ‘This can’t be it either.’

 

 

“My friend, a Christian who had earlier said to ‘vow to God’, said, ‘Why don’t you try Islam?’

I said, ‘Naah man! They’re terrorists! I’m not going near a mosque. No way!’

“But I found myself near a mosque, Preston Mosque. I went in and started to ask questions. And basically every question I asked, no-one would answer from their minds, everyone was pulling out a Qur’an and saying, ‘Here it is.’ And that really surprised me because (almost) every time I went to a priest, I did not see the Bible once. They almost never pulled out the Bible, they were just, ‘Here’s your answer.’ This was the same with almost every religion. There were some who did read from the Bible a couple of times. But in the mosque, every single time - out came the Qur’an, and that got me. This is not about these people, it’s about the Book, and that’s when I started reading the Qur’an. It took months and months though, six to seven months. I had a lot of questions!”

 

At the end of these months how did this young man, now twenty years of age, decide to become Muslim?

The crucial moment of his conversion came one night, as he explained:

 

“One night I had just been speaking to a couple of Australian brothers at the mosque. They told me to take the Qur’an home and read it. I had already taken one, but they gave me this one with big letters - the other one I had was little and was harder to read. That night I sat in bed and lit a candle. I had the window open. It was a nice summer’s night. It had this atmosphere, this religious atmosphere. I was set, and I was sitting there thinking, ‘This is beautiful and very sacred!’

 

“Everything was really good and I started reading Qur’an and thinking, ‘This is very beautiful, it says exactly what I think it should say.’ It feels like it’s right you know, but I’m not quite there, you know! I just need a bit of a hand. And I sat back, Qur’an in hand, and said, ‘O God, give me a sign! But it has to be pretty good - like lightning,’ - and it was a clear summer’s night. ‘If you do lightning, I’m yours - I’m your servant. And maybe if you can’t do lightning - something like a crack or something; or a flash of light; or the candle! I would be pretty impressed if the candle just blew up to about two feet high, you know, like in the movies!”

 

“And I’m sitting there waiting!”. . . . .

 

“Nothing at all happened! Like I couldn’t even say a creak in the wall was my sign! So I’m sitting there pretty disappointed, and I’m angry . . Right? And I’m like, ‘God, I’m asking you. You’re supposed to be All-Powerful! Alright - I’m going to give you a second chance.’ Like that was a fair bit to ask - summer, lightning! ‘Okay, maybe like, a car can just backfire that goes past - that’s something that happens all the time, but at least I’ll know it’s for me.’ So I lowered my levels . . Right?

 

“Subhan’Allah!” (Exalted is Allah) he exclaims, shaking his head at the very thought of it. “And I’m sitting there thinking, ‘Alright!’ So I look around again - Nothing! All is so silent . . I could have been in space. Not even an ant made a noise, and by this time I was shattered, because this was the moment! I had thought, ‘This is it!’ you know, ‘This is my time!’ . . . And nothing happened!”

 

“So I’m sitting there, pretty disappointed, and I thought, ‘I may as well keep on reading Qur’an”. So I looked down and turned the page, and the very next ayat (verse) was something to the effect: For those of you who ask for signs, have I not shown you enough already? Look around at the sky, the trees, the water, these are your signs. These are the Signs for those who know!”

 

“Lo! In the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the difference of night and day, and the ships which run upon the sea with that which is of use to men, and the water which Allah sendeth down from the sky, thereby reviving the earth after its death, and dispersing all kinds of beasts therein, and (in) the ordinance of the winds, and the clouds obedient between heaven and earth: are signs (of Allah's Sovereignty) for people who have sense.”  Surah 2:162

 

“I was sitting down; I freaked out! I closed the Qur’an and chucked the quilt over my head. I was freaking out because here it was! You know what I mean?”

 

“So the next morning I went straight to the mosque and told them I wanted to become Muslim, because I had had my sign.  I had it, even thought it was not my sign.  I shouldn’t be arrogant and think I have a sign. 

Isn’t the water my sign and all these things around me are signs, you know, that there is a Creator!”

 

With this in mind, one cannot help but wonder whether this young man had put aside all his previous fears of terrorism and danger which he and countless peoples perceive to be part of Islam and Muslims?

                                                                                               

But let us continue:

“That evening at the mosque there were all these Muslims there - heaps of people! And I’m thinking, ‘Look at this religion. So many people! They’re all so strong!’ Then I realised that it was the first night of Ramadan, the fasting month. They were all there to do their last prayer (for the day) you know. But I really did think this was amazing. So you see, my first real experience there was this. Quite honestly there must have been a thousand people at Preston Mosque that night, maybe more!

 

“While I was waiting to give the Shahadah (the declaration of faith) there at tarawih (the night prayer during Ramadan), I’m sitting there thinking, ‘If I get these words wrong I’m a dead man! They’re going to kill me!’

 

“So now I’m standing up there, in front of all these people, and Sheikh Fehmi says to me, ‘These are the words that you say,’ and so I started saying them.  And I’ve got to admit that I was nervous before - but as soon as I started speaking the words, I felt like it was just me standing there by myself; like, that there was no-one else, and I felt, honestly, the only way I can describe this feeling is as if there is a shower on the inside of my head - a cold shower, going straight through my body.  I’m standing there, hair standing on end . . . then all the brothers came and hugged me!”

 

One can only imagine the warmth and fellowship that this young brother experienced; such that fear of terrorism and its accompanying horrors melted away in the light of knowledge and the empathy of brotherhood which is peculiar to Islam alone. Is it not said: “He it is that hath strengthened thee (Muhammad) with His aid and with (the company of) the Believers. And (moreover) He hath put affection between their hearts: Not if thou hadst spent all that is in the earth, couldst thou have produced that affection, but Allah hath done it: for He is Exalted in might, Wise.”(Qur’an 8:62,63).

 

However, this was not all he learned, his education was just beginning:

 

“But you know, I didn’t even know how to pray! I had to fast - and I was still eating ham! I didn’t even know that you shouldn’t eat it - so I’m fasting and then eating, like, a whopper burger with ham. I didn’t know it was haram (forbidden) but I did know that you’re not supposed to eat from before sunrise until after sunset. You know, I was fasting, but it was pretty hard!”

 

So did Abu Bakr, his chosen Islamic name, finally reach his goal?

 

“I (now) know why I am here; what I am here to do; and what it is all about.”

 

When asked if becoming Muslim had changed his personality and his life his reply was:

“I feel like I am here for a different purpose, but I don’t think that if you met me when I was fifteen years old and then you met me now that you’d say, ‘Man! You have changed so much! You’re not the same person I knew before.’ I think I have carried through most of the person I always was. I just don’t do some things I used to do. And I don’t think in some ways about things that I used to think about. I think I’ve always been positive, but Islam has given me that (extra) - like if the guy outside put his bobcat through the house, I’d just go: ‘Subhan’Allah! I’ll have to fix that.’ It’s not like I’m going to go, ‘Oh why do you always do this to me?’ You know, it’s just a thing that is not so important. Probably my priorities are completely different. Like, before, it was all (about) me!”

 

Abu Bakr’s family received news of his reversion very positively: “My family was happy for me but concerned as to how this would change our relationship.” Of course friendships did not all stand the test: “I lost a few friends (so-called) as I no longer wanted to drink, go out, etc.”

 

Of reversion generally he stated: “I use the word revert because, I mean, everyone uses convert because that is just a Western ideal. You know (in the Western context) that you have converted to something. But when you look into Islam I guess you realise that the term Muslim just means it comes from Islam, Right? It is a statement of what you are. So Islam means to submit your will to God; to do what God asks you to

do; whereas a Muslim is someone who is doing it. So if you are not doing what God has asked you, you are not a Muslim. So, in effect, Muslim is not a noun, it’s a doing word (a verb). Therefore, my tree in the backyard is doing what God asked it. The tree is Muslim to me, you know! It’s submitting its will to God. Everything has energy. So when you’re born, you’re Muslim, you know! ‘I’m hungry’ - you cry - that’s Islamic you know,” he says laughing. “You are acting in accordance with your nature, and it’s only when you get a little bit older, and people teach you stuff, that you go away from Islam because you take on someone else’s ideals. Then when you want to come back, you revert, because you were already Muslim when you were born.”

                                                                                               

So it was that in 1996 in Preston Victoria a young Australian man found that for which he was searching. His life has been quite eventful and it is noted that Abu Bakr is now a Psychologist and a Film maker. May it please Almighty Allah to continue to bless this young man.


http://members.iinet.net.au/~asmaazam/21st%20Century%20Revert%20Stories/Revert%20Stories.htm
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A Typical Aussie Turns to Islam
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2007, 05:56:02 PM »
 :salam:



I saw the Muslim women as being strong and empowered, yet they were gentle and kind
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Why I returned to Islam?
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2007, 09:19:28 AM »
 :salam:



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Why I returned to Islam?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For anyone who is considering reverting to Islam I strongly encourage you to do so. Don’t wait for your parents to accept it, don’t wait until you “know everything” about it.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My journey to Islam started many years ago. I always had an interest in religion and explored many religions prior to reverting to Islam.

Why do I say reverted? Since I believe that all people are born Muslims and then may or may not be raised in Islam by their parents.

I originally started out as a Roman Catholic. My parents sent me to a Catholic school, but they were pagans. They did not worship the true God of the Jews, Christians and Muslims. My father read tarot cards and believed that there was no god at all. My mother practised various forms of witchcraft, reading palms, reading tea leaves, peering into a crystal ball and speaking with the dead. (Of course I now know that this is all the result of evil jinn and shaitan).

My parents sent me to Catholic school so I would receive a “private education”. Of course I quickly became confused as to the existence of God and the whole idea of religion due to my parents’ influence. As time went on I studied various New Age belief systems, but they always seemed like hocuspocus and rang false. Then I became interested in Buddhism.

By this time my parents had become abusive towards me and my father would taunt me whenever he caught me praying saying “There is no God” or “God can’t help you”... So this only intensified my search...

Eventually I married and moved overseas. I went to Japan for 3 years. I was so excited as I thought I would learn all about Buddhism and become “enlightened”. Well, that isn’t what happened. I went to Japan and saw that the Japanese weren’t any more enlightened than we were! In fact some things that went on were worse than I expected!

Then I saw some Muslims in Uno Park. They held Juma prayer there each Friday.




I remember staring at the women in hijab. They probably thought I was rude, but actually I was quite fascinated... But I didn’t approach them.

When I returned to the United States I still was interested in Islam, but I wasn’t able to find any reliable books on the subject at the local library and at that time did not have a computer. So I let the matter rest. But, Thank God! I started meeting Muslims everywhere I went! So eventually I worked up the courage to go to a Masjid and started studying. Eventually I made shahada and two weeks later my husband made shahada as well... Alhamdulillah!





That was a few years ago and I must say that since I converted to Islam I have been so happy! I won’t say it has been easy. I lost my entire family over it as they are not real happy about my reversion to Islam especially since I try to practise it the best way I can. My husband’s family has been more accepting than mine!

For anyone who is considering reverting to Islam I strongly encourage you to do so. Don’t wait for your parents to accept it, don’t wait until you “know everything” about it. That day may never come. Make your shahada and trust in Allah to take care of things from there!


http://www.islamicvoice.com/february.2000/embraced.htm
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Pastor's Wife Converts to Islam
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2007, 09:24:05 AM »
 :salam:



Pastor's Wife Converts to Islam - Habiba Adamu

http://www.shariahprogram.ca/women-islam/pastors-wife-converts-islam.shtml



Her name is Fatima Edoh, a 47-year-old Deeper Life elder.





 She lives in Karon-Majigi, a satellite town located along Airport Road in Abuja.




On April 12, 2001, Fatima performed ablution and recited Lailaha Illa Llaahu, Muhammadu Rasullullah (Salallahu Alaihi wa salam).



She accepted the Islamic faith and converted to Islam.



 Fatima, who hails from Togo, a small West African country, is married to a Deeper Life Pastor who hails from Benue State. With four children, Fatima said she never had any personal problem with her husband neither did she experience maltreatment from him. She was neither underfed nor uncattered for in any form.





The Deeper Life elder narrated her experience to Abuja Trust thus:-


"On a night, sometimes in April this year, I had a dream. It was about the calling of Adhan - the Muslim call for prayer. The following night I had the same dream. After the first dream, I confided in an old Muslim woman who happens to be one of my customers. She told me that the dream was a divine calling for me to become a Muslim. I refuted it and left her after my second dream, I had to organise myself to embrace Islam, which I did successfully without my husband and relations' knowledge.

When my family heard about my conversion, they were not pleased. It was bad news for my relations, friends, church members, husband and a host of others with whom I worship at the Deeper Life Church.
 




Even my daughter who is a nurse, when I informed her, she thought that I was crazy. She went ahead as she had threatened to pack all her belongings in my house and leave me. She forsook me."

Mallama Fatima told Abuja Trust that she was traumatised as a result of her decision to convert to Islam. She recounted further:- "It all began with my church members quarrelling with me. They warned that I was going the dangerous way. When all verbal effort to change my mind failed, enemies resorted to witchcrafts and charms. At one time, I became seriously sick. My stomach was swollen like that of a pregnant woman. In fact when I was taken to the hospital, doctors could not diagnose my ailment. Instead, I was told that it was not an hospital matter.

"I was later taken to a Mallam who wrote some verses of the Quran on a slate and rinsed it for me to drink. The Mallam prayed for me and told me that I was going to vomit through out the night. I drank it, and throughout the night, I was vomiting. When morning came, I felt strong and healthy! It was a wonderful experience."

According to Fatima, her church members were surprised that her protruded stomach had become normal. She continued her narration: "After some period of time, another traumatic experience started. I began to see some people in my dreams with blood in their mouth. This time around, some Muslim brothers and sisters in prayers joined me. That was how I overcame the problem."

Perhaps worst than Fatima's health problems was the fact that her father and in-law disowned her. The old woman only reacted with a lot of tears but could not change her mind. Said she, "My family members told me that I had brought shame to them by converting to a Muslim. They persuaded me to reconvert to Christianity. They applied a lot of tactics. They even drew my attention to the attack on America, but I was rather angered. I told them that there is no evidence that Muslims masterminded the attack for religious purpose. If you know the Muslim very well, you will agree with me that they are a peace loving people."

As far as Fatima is concerned, her conversion to Islam was a manifestation of divine calls. As expected, Fatima received a lot of assistance from Muslim brothers and sisters. Her ordeals was so deep that she even had to be assisted with such things as dresses to wear and mattress to sleep on, after her daughter made away with all her belongings. But the woman had what she described as a pleasant dream. "While I was in the hospital, I had a dream that my spirit was lifted from the earth to a big building. I was ushered in by a small girl through a big gate and was welcomed by some women dressed like me in white gowns, gloves and socks. They sang some beautiful songs to me in a language quite foreign. I woke up only to find myself on the hospital bed with drips. I am also pleased to tell you that my son-in-law has converted to Islam through my influence. I believe it is gradual. Some day, we will all become Muslims.

"I must tell you however, that when my son-in-law converted, I received serious warning from some people who told me that they were aware that my conversion would influence a lot of people, adding that I should be careful.

But I replied and told them that I had converted many people to Christianity when I was one. Today I am no longer a Christian, so why should they be aggrieved at that."

Fatima, who is firm in her decision and actions further told Abuja Trust that she used to lock her door in the night for fear of physical attack from enemies. Now she is no longer afraid of them for she knows that the heaven is open for those who die in the pursuit of the course of Allah.

Mallama Fatima has since converted two other Christians to Islam, one of whom is her sister.





[Source: Madrasah In'aamiyah]






http://www.shariahprogram.ca/articles/convert_revert_islam_birthright.shtml
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Experiences Of A Recently Converted Hindu Woman
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2007, 09:29:14 AM »
 :salam:



Experiences Of A Recently Converted Hindu Woman





I came from a purely Hindu family where we were always taught to regard ourselves (i.e. women) as beings who were eventually to be married off, have children and serve the husband - whether he was kind or not. Other than this I found that there were a lot of things which really oppressed women, such as:


If a woman was widowed, she would always have to wear a white sari (costume), eat vegetarian meals, cut her hair short, and never re-marry.


The bride always had to pay the dowry (bridal money) to the husband's family. And the husband could ask for anything, irrespective of whether the bride would have difficulty paying it.
Not only that, if after marriage she was not able to pay the full dowry she would be both emotionally and physically tortured. She could end up being a victim of "kitchen death" where the husband, or both the mother-in-law and the husband, try to set fire to the wife while she is cooking or is in the kitchen, to make it look like an accidental death.
 





More and more of these incidents are taking place. The daughter of a friend of my own father met the same fate last year!



In addition to all this, men in Hinduism are treated literally as gods. In one of the religious Hindu celebrations, unmarried girls pray for and worship an idol representing a particular god (Shira) so that they may have husbands like him. Even my own mother had asked me to do this. This made me see that the Hindu religion, based on superstitions and things that have no manifest proof and were merely traditions, which oppressed women, could not be right.

Subsequently, when I came to England to study, I thought that at least this was a country, which gave equal rights to men and women, and did not oppress them. We all had the freedom to do as we liked, I thought. Well, as I started to meet people, make new friends, learn about this new society, and go to all the places my friends went to in order to "socialize" (bars, dance halls, etc.), I realized that this "equality" was not so true in practice as it was in theory.

Outwardly, women were seen to be given equal rights in education, work, and so forth, but in reality women were still oppressed in a different, subtler way. When I went with my friends to the places they hung out at, I found everybody interested to talk to me and I thought that was normal. But it was only later that I realized how naïve I was, and recognized what these people were really looking for. I soon began to feel uncomfortable, as if I was not myself: I had to dress in a certain way so that people would like me, and had to talk in a certain way to please them. I soon found that I was feeling more and more uncomfortable, less and less myself, yet I could not get out. Everybody was saying they were enjoying themselves, but I don't call this enjoyment.

I think women in this way of life are oppressed; they have to dress in a certain way in order to please men and appear more appealing, and also, talk in a certain way so people like them. During this time I had not thought about Islam, even though I had some Muslim acquaintances. But I felt I really had to do something, to find something that I would be happy and secure with, and would feel respectable. Something to believe in that is the right belief, because everybody has a belief that they live according to. If having fun by getting off with other people is someone's belief, they do this. If making money is someone's belief, they do everything to achieve this. If they believe drinking is one way to enjoy life then they do it. But I feel all this leads to nowhere; no one is truly satisfied, and the respect women are looking for is diminished in this way.

In these days of so-called "equal rights", you are expected to have a boyfriend (or you're weird!) and to not be a virgin. So this is a form of oppression, even though some women do not realize it. When I came to Islam, it was obvious that I had finally found permanent security. A religion, a belief that was so complete and clear in every aspect of life. Many people have a misconception that Islam is an oppressive religion, where women are covered from head to toe, and are not allowed any freedom or rights. In fact, women in Islam are given more rights, and have been for the past 1400 years, compared to the only-recently rights given to non-Muslim women in some western and other societies. But there are, even now, societies where women are still oppressed, as I mentioned earlier in relation to Hindu women.

Muslim women have the right to inheritance. They have the right to run their own trade and business. They have the full right to ownership, property, disposal over their wealth to which the husband has no right. They have the right to education, a right to refuse marriage as long as this refusal is according to reasonable and justifiable grounds. The Qur'an itself, which is the Word of God, contains many verses commanding men to be kind to their wives and stressing the rights of women. Islam has the right set of rules, because they are NOT made by men, but by God; hence it is a perfect religion.

Quite often Muslim women are asked why they are covered from head to toe, and are told that this is oppression - it is not. In Islam, marriage is an important part of life, the making of the society. Therefore, a woman should not go around showing herself to everybody, only her husband. Even the man is not allowed to show certain parts of his body to no one but his wife. In addition, God has commanded Muslim women to cover themselves for their modesty: "O Prophet! Tell your wives and your daughters and the women of the believers to draw their cloaks (veils) over their bodies (when outdoors). That is most convenient that they could be known as such (i.e. decent and chaste) and not molested." (Qur'an 33:59)
If we look around at any other society, we find that in the majority of cases women are attacked and molested because of how they are dressed.

Another point I'd like to comment on is that the rules and regulation laid down in Islam by God, do not apply just to women but to men also. There is no intermingling and free mixing between men and women for the benefit of both. Whatever God commands is right, wholesome, pure and beneficial to mankind. There is no doubt about that. A verse in the Qur'an explains this concept clearly: "Say to the believing men that they should lower their gaze and protect their private parts (i.e. from indecency, illegal sexual acts, etc.); that will make for greater purity for them. And God is well aware of what they do. And say to the believing women that they should lower their gaze and protect their private parts (from indecency, illegal sexual intercourse, etc.); and that they should not display their beauty and ornaments . . . " (Qur'an, Surah Al-Nur 24:31)

When I put on my hijab (veil), I was really happy to do it. In fact, I really wanted to do it. When I put on the hijab, I felt a great sense of satisfaction and happiness because I had obeyed God's command. And I was so happy with the good and blessings that came with it. I have felt secure and protected. In fact people respect me more for it. I could really see the difference in their behavior towards me.

Finally, I'd like to say that I had accepted Islam not blindly, or under any compulsion. In the Qur'an itself there is a verse "Let there be no compulsion in religion". I accepted Islam with conviction. I have seen, been there, done that, and seen both sides of the story. I know and have experienced what the other side is like, and I know that I have done the right thing. Islam does not oppress women, but rather Islam liberates them and gives them the respect they deserve. Islam is the religion God has chosen for the whole of mankind. Those who accept it are truly liberated from the chains and shackles of mankind, whose rulings and legislating necessitates nothing but the oppression of one group by another and the exploitation and oppression of one sex by the other. This is not the case in Islam, which truly liberates women and gives them an individuality not given by any other authority.

Sister Noor has been a Muslim for over a year and a half and is currently in her second year of undergraduate study in the Department of Biology at University of Essex, U. K.

Author : Sister Noor


[Source: Madrasah In'aamiyah]


http://www.shariahprogram.ca/women-islam/hindu-woman-converts-islam.shtml
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AMERICAN NEW MUSLIM'S STORY OF CONVERSION
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2007, 09:38:05 AM »
 :salam:


REHANA: AMERICAN NEW MUSLIM'S STORY OF CONVERSION

There is a lot of mobility in America. It is estimated that on an average one family does not stay in one place for more than five years. In that sense my family was a true American family. We moved from Seattle to suburban Los Angeles, California. Our nearest Muslim neighbor was brother Abdul Wahab. We not only met in mosque daily but also regularly sharing a cup of tea. One day Abdul Wahab described the challenges and tests he went through the proceeding the acceptance of Islam by his wife, Rehana. He described his story:

"When I married Rehana, I was a non-practicing Muslim. She was also a non-practicing Christian. I rarely went to mosque and she never went to her church. In due course of time Allah blessed us with children. I tried to talk to her about going to a mosque. She bluntly refused. To my surprise, she even started going to a church. Now the more I invited her to the mosque, the more she ran to attend church. Nobody ever wins against a woman anyway.
 

I offered her a compromise very gently and respectfully. One weekend we will both go to a church and the other weekend to a mosque. She reluctantly agreed. In this way I wished to give her exposure to Islam."

I said to myself, "I must become a good practicing Muslim and behave in the best Islamic manners at home and with others around me. This is the only way she can discover and cherish true Islamic values." I shaped up. The merits and negative aspects of husband and wife cannot remain hidden from each other since they are closely interacting with each other.

This was a new but a beautiful life style for me. I had to act as a model to see positive results. Rehana started understanding Islam very gradually, but surely, through positive experiences at home and in the Muslim society. Her appreciation of Islam grew day by day. Finally she embraced Islam. Alhamdulillah.

Rehana was now a different woman. She covered her head like a model Muslim woman. She wondered why many born Muslim women do not adhere to Islamic dress code. She wanted her children to be educated in full time Islamic school. She was continuously educating herself. She demanded tapes from her husband of Fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) lessons offered by Dr. Muzammil Siddiqui in the mosque to enhance her educational activities and Islamic growth.

Abdul Wahab's problems were over and Rehana's problems had just started. She struggled hard to learn more and more about Islam. Whatever she learnt she wanted to put into practice since it was very satisfying for the heart and mind. She absorbed Islamic values very cool mindedly.

Whenever we talked to her we found her to be a more real Muslima than born and traditional Muslims. Her love for Islamic practice was inspiring for us. Rehana was very grateful to her husband for this extra ordinary gift of Islamic faith and values.

Her parents were residing in Chicago. Her acceptance of Islam was a big shock for them. They reacted very adversely. Her father was very rigid, rough and blunt. Her parents even stopped visiting her. Rehana considered it her duty to visit them hoping to guide them to the right path. She used to come back to Los Angeles tired and torn. Rehana used to take the children with her to Chicago. The grand parents were surprised and impressed by the wonderful behaviour and manners of the young Muslim children. Deep in their hearts they started feeling, that perhaps Islam is not that bad. So much so that the grand parents agreed to visit Rehana in Los Angeles. We learnt this news as well. Finally to our great pleasure and surprise they were in Los Angeles.

I invited Abdul Wahab's family over a dinner. I also invited Mr. and Mrs. Naseem since Mrs. Naseem was also a new American Muslima who always observed Islamic dress code. Our intention was to give the grand parents more exposure to Muslims. We had a wonderful evening and stayed together up to midnight. The grand parents became very friendly. We all left each other around 1 A.M. in good mood.

Here a side note is necessary. Rehana and her family walked to their home. Mr. and Mrs. Naseem had to drive about twenty miles to Riverside at these late hours of night. Drunk driving is very treacherous at such late hours. Mr. and Mrs. Naseem were hit hard by another car. Both were thrown out of their car. Mr. Naseem lost consciousness and was lying on the roadside. Mrs. Naseem had severe bone injuries but was still in her senses. This young woman in Islamic dress was sitting beside her husband and loudly and continuously reciting Quran. Paramedical personnel arrived on the scene. They saw there a strangely dressed woman and heard her talking in some foreign language. Their first question to her was, "Do you speak English?" Mrs. Naseem answered them in English and told them that she was reciting Quran in Arabic. After many months of hospitalization, both were up and running again by the Grace of God Almighty.

Rehana's parents went back to Chicago after a brief stay. She wished, that somehow, they would accept Islam. One day my wife told me that Rehana was crying because her mother was seriously ill. Rehana was worried that her mother might die before accepting Islam and thus she would end up in hell. Unfortunately her mother died as disbeliever.

It was now even more difficult to talk to her father. All of us were trying to help the situation. Abdul Wahab used to visit his father-in-law in Chicago without annoying him. Rehana's father was my friend too. I wanted to do my part.

I moved to Detroit, Michigan at that time. I called Rehana's father from Detroit and invited him to visit us since we were not too far away from him. Unfortunately the image of Detroit was tarnished at that time because of foul play of some policemen in the city. Rehana's father answered favorably, "Imtiaz, I would love to see you but I will try my best never to pass through Detroit in my life."

May Allah guide Rehana's father to the right path. Ameen.


Later on I asked Abdul Qadar the reason for her crying. He said, "Suzan refused to go to mosque again. She felt that her question had annoyed the person who answered her with a very serious face. She did not like to annoy anybody."

To the best of our knowledge and judgement the respondent was not annoyed. He only had a serious look. I said to Abdul Qadar, "Please explain to her calmly and cool mindedly that most people from India and Pakistan have serious faces. You can see this at any airport or bus station or shopping center. This is our cultural drawback." Suzan gradually digested this idea and after few months returned to the mosque. She learned more and more about Islam every week. She found question and answers session very beneficial in understanding Islamic values and faith. She developed friendship with many other ladies in the mosque and received lots of encouragement and respect.

She liked this new way of life and wished to embrace Islam. I had the honor to make her recite Shahada, the Islamic pledge. After that she was a Muslima and our sister. I also performed the Islamic marriage between them in the mosque the same day. Suzan was enjoying a new life under the blessings of the Islamic faith.

During the Islamic marriage I explained them that it was mandatory for the husband to give Mahr to his wife. It can be in coin or kind. I also reminded them that Mahr is the personal property of the wife and she can use it the way she chooses. Husband has no say in it throughout his life. Abdul Qadar eagerly agreed to pay Mahr. Suzan was amazed to see the respect accorded to a woman in Islam and the way her rights were preserved. It definitely strengthened her Islamic Faith. This situation took place in the State of Maryland.

It will be very interesting to mention another similar situation that took place in the state of Michigan a few years later. As Imam of the Tawheed Mosque, it was one of my duties to perform marriages in this State. A Muslim youth requested me to perform his marriage with a lady. I explained them the rights of men and women in Islam and about the Mahr. Both of them filled the prescribed forms for the marriage and the form for payment of Mahr. After that I asked them if they had any question on their minds before entering into a marriage bond? The lady said, "I have no question". The young man said, "I have an important question to ask you". He said, "I understand that I am supposed to give her Mahr and that will be exclusively her personal property. Is she not similarly supposed to give me Mahr?"

I told him that in Islam the Mahr is for wife only. He was very much surprised to learn this. The lady was amazed, like Suzan, to see the dignity and honor accorded to a woman in Islam. She was also somewhat amused by this conversation.

She chose to be called Saeeda since she was very gentle and nice to everybody. She embraced Islam with clear knowledge, utmost sincerity and full commitment. She immediately started observing full Islamic dress irrespective of fear from neighbours and general public. Her daughters were going to elementary school at that time. She motivated them and asked them to wear scarf in school in spite of the fact that the children tried to make fun of them. I told her that it was not necessary for the young girls for the time being to face the difficult situation in the school. But Saeeda emphasised that they should learn and observe Islamic way of life from their younger age. Saeeda and her two young daughters dressed in accordance with the Islamic code looked very outstanding and graceful when seen in shopping center or other public places.

This was her level of faith and commitment. Her husband used to laugh at himself. He felt that we born Muslims take Islam very easy and hence our commitment is shaky. Abdul-Qadar and Saeeda have a very peaceful and enviable family life.





[Source: Madrasah In'aamiyah]


http://www.shariahprogram.ca/women-islam/rehana-story-of-reversion.shtml
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You Are a Muslim, You Just Don’t Know It Yet
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2007, 05:35:07 PM »
 :salam:


By  Abu Mohammed Abdullah Yousef
 
 
 
 
 
 
I was born in England just after World War II. My family are Catholic. My father, who was a Methodist, converted to Catholicism to marry my mother.



We were brought up in a strictly religious manner and I could answer the Mass in Latin before I could read or write in English. Religion was one of my favorite subjects at school. I did well at it too.




 By the time I was eleven I earned a scholarship to a boarding school run by Jesuit priests and my parents were hoping that they would have a priest in the family – every Catholic parent’s dream.





At the school however, I began to notice the inconsistencies between what was taught in religious lessons and what was taught in history classes. When I started to question the teachers about the differences in history and religious lessons and asked which was correct, I was told that I was just learning history as a subject to pass an exam but that with religion, I had to have faith.





 Around this time too, there was a change of Pope. Pope Pius XXII died in 1958 and Pope John XXIII was elected as his successor. Catholics are taught that the Pope is infallible (incapable of being wrong) and yet, rules are often changed/updated by new Popes.





 It seemed illogical to me that some things had to be changed if the previous Pope was incapable of making a mistake. In the 14th and 15th centuries there was a period when there were two Popes, one in France and one in Rome. Each of Popes excommunicated and constantly ruled against one another. For a very short time there were even three Popes. How could two or even three Popes, be infallible if they constantly ruled against one another?




 The more I learned, the more unsettled I became. I questioned everything; after all, if something is true, it should be easy to explain. The teachers grew more frustrated with my questions and ended up beating me with canes because they could not give me proper answers. Repeatedly I was told I just had to have faith.





One time, after being beaten I ran away and when I arrived home I was beaten again by my father because I left the school. He was insisting that I should go back, but I told him I was determined that if he took me back, I would run away again. There was no option but for me to leave the school and go to a normal high school.





 All the time that I remained at home, I was made to attend Church with the rest of my family, but my heart was no longer in it. At that time, I became an Agnostic… not sure of my beliefs, but knowing that the one religion I did know anything about was not correct.

As soon as I could, I left home. I joined the Royal Air Force when I was 15 years old and did not go to Church at that time. I met my future wife when I went to her home on vacation with her brother. She belonged to the Church of Scotland (a Protestant, Church). We decided not to have a church wedding, but under pressure from her father, we visited the local minister together. He asked me about my beliefs and I was totally truthful with him.




 He was a good, straightforward person and we had several meetings and, much to our surprise, he appreciated the fact that I was honest with him. Although I never agreed with his views on religion, he agreed to marry us anyway, giving us the Bible that he used in the service as a wedding gift. We had a quiet wedding with only the minister, my wife and I, her father and two witnesses in the church.

After I finished my service in the RAF, I left the UK in 1976 to work in a Muslim country teaching Electronics to air force officers and NCOs. I never knew a Muslim before this time, and I had certain preset ideas (all wrong I hasten to add) of what Islam was about. There was nothing in the behavior of the students that really impressed me.





They were not praying and in general they did not have a religious attitude; some were even drinking and womanizing. Most of them had a rather lackadaisical attitude to their studies, saying “Insha’Allah” to all my instructions, and they gave me the impression that they didn’t really have to work hard; their philosophy was “whatever will be, will be”. I started to read the Qur’an for two reasons: firstly, I wanted to be a good instructor, and had hoped that if I could get inside the students’ mindset then I would get my points across to them better and hopefully instill in them more enthusiasm for their studies, and secondly, I wanted to prove Islam wrong.





Once the students found out that I was reading Qur’an, they brought a Sheikh to the classroom to talk to me. We had several detailed discussions, and he questioned me about my beliefs. At the end of one of our talks, the Sheikh said to me, “You are Muslim, you just don’t know it yet”.




For several months I continued to read Qur’an, and the more I read, the more impressed I was by the logic, consistency and purity of Islam. The rest, as they say, is history… I made Shahadah late in 1976
 
http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1154235116741&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout
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Re: Converts ( Revert Muslims ) Around the World
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2007, 09:58:33 AM »
 :salam:




In the name of GOD, MOST GRACIOUS, MOST MERCIFUL


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stories of New Muslims



The following list is sorted by receival date:




1- Mona (Ecuador/USA) 11/23/96 : Catholic Background

2- Fouad Haddad (Lebanon) 02/01/97: Catholic Background

3- Diana (CO, USA) 02/04/97: Mormon/Protestant Background

4- Amina (Canada) 02/06/97: Christian...

5- AbdulHAQQ -DTF Wong- (China) 04/01/97: Protestant/Anglican

6- Rashida (Rachel) Singer (USA) 04/22/97: Jew/Roman Catholic

7- Joakim Aboo Ayyub Lindroos 08/14/97: Protestant-Lutheran

8- Maryam al Maydayah 08/24/98: Catholic Background

9- Phreddie 09/04/99: Christian nondenominational Background

10- Sumaiya (Kristin) 01/25/2000: Catholic Background

11- Hayat Anne Osman 01/01/2001: Catholic Background (NEW)


http://members.aol.com/askgive/stories.htm
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Re: Converts ( Revert Muslims ) Around the World
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2010, 05:54:17 PM »
 :salam:

Comedian Preacher Moss's Journey to Islam




Founder of "Allah Made Me Funny" Comedy Group

 Interviewed By Dilshad D. Ali
 





 
Preacher Moss 
 
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If you've ever seen Preacher Moss of the "Allah Made Me Funny" comedy trio perform, then you've heard this joke. "If it were legally possible, I'd change my name to 'Allahu Akbar,'" Preacher says. Then he goes into a bit on how great it would sound at the airport to hear security officials to read off his passport, "Allahu Akbar."
 

But that's not the best part of the joke. "Meet my children," Preacher says. "'Mashallah' and 'Inshallah.'" And that's when the laughter really starts flowing. But the final stomach-hurting guffaws come at the very end of the routine: "And then my third child will say, 'That's not Daddy's name.' So I'll point to him and say, 'You'll have to pardon my youngest. He's named 'Astaghfirullah' (I seek Allah's forgiveness)."

 

It's jokes like these about being Muslim-American mixed in with Preacher's unique take on the black experience that has made him a mainstay on the American comedy circuit and in the entertainment industry. But what really lends weight to Preacher's humor is the life experience he brings to the table from growing up on the streets of Washington D.C. as a Christian from a church-going family during a time when "Protest Islam," as Preacher calls it, was beckoning many young black youth.

 

Whether in his comedy routine or in an interview, Preacher makes it a point to reference his Christian upbringing as a grounding influence. But there was something special about Islam that drew him as a youth, as he watched the rise of the Black Panther movement and the Nation of Islam, with leaders like Malcolm X, and its positive influence over black youth in Washington D.C.

 

Two memories stand out for Preacher for how he learned about the great power and beauty of what he dubs "protest Islam" and "regular Islam", or the Islam born out of the Nation of Islam and black pride versus the Islam practiced by thousands of other immigrant and first-generation communities.


 
I saw that he had something. He was on the path to go somewhere great. He knew something that I didn't know about.
 


The first memory was of his classmate in school, a Muslim practicing a daily kind of Islam that seemed ordinary to Preacher. But he respected his classmate for adhering to his faith, even though it was difficult to do so at times.
 

The other, more impactful memory was one of a fellow Preacher knew on the streets of D.C. who was consistently in and out of trouble.

One day Preacher and his friends heard that this troubled youth had met his demise. They went to his house to pay respects to his mother and saw books about Islam strewn about his room. "I saw that he had something. He was on the path to go somewhere great. He knew something that I didn't know about," Preacher recalls, "and I was eager to know more about that path."

 

Taking the Shahadah (Tesstimony of Fatih) and & Growing Culture

 

Becoming a Muslim was something that slowly took over Preacher as he made it through the teenage years into life as a college student at Marquette University in Wisconsin, where he studied journalism and film.

 

"During the college years, coming to Islam was a fight," Preacher says. "Do I want to go this way or do I want to stay that way? It was a lot of internal conflict. You're consumed about this process, what it's going to do to you, without understanding the value of the process."

 

Preacher, who doesn't remember the exact date of his Shahadah, though it did happen after his college years, learned his Islam from many sources. He became a teacher working with emotionally disturbed children and did comedy on the side. The real journey began after taking his Shahadah.

 

As Preacher read more about Islam and spent time with people learning the faith, he found that the words of the Quran and the traditions of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) were true and absolute. But the people explaining things about Islam to him were either helpful or manipulative.


 
What are you talking about, comedy being bidah? You just drove away in an innovation!
 

"There was comfort in what I was going through as an individual, but also there was enlightenment for what I had to do to grow the culture and faith around me. There's no way there would've been an 'Allah Made Me Funny" had I not learned how to grow the culture."

 

Indeed, it was this concept of growing a "culture of faith" that propelled Preacher along his Islamic path. "I ran into people, some of them were very knowledgeable, who would talk about this tradition of Quran and prophetic growth and pathways, but in the end, it becomes a stalemate because they weren't good at growing culture."

 

"They were good at talking about culture of several hundred years ago, but they couldn't replicate it (for modern times)," Preacher says. "It's an unnatural balance, where knowledge becomes the only thing of value at that point. What I found that it went directly against the whole idea of the protest religion, in which we're inspired to grow and deliver and develop a culture where we live our Islamic faith in our lives today."

 

He cites an example when a Muslim who saw him perform on stage in Philadelphia confronted him afterwards, saying "comedy is haram (forbidden) and bidah (an innovation), and the tradition of Prophet Muhammad doesn't allow it."

 

When the rant was done, the man got into his car and just drove away. "What are you talking about, comedy being bidah? You just drove away in an innovation!" Preacher says.

 

The Comedian and His Islam

 

Growing into Islam was a struggle in itself, especially as Preacher delved further into his love of comedy and became a part of the entertainment industry. With Hollywood calling him, Preacher quit teaching, gave his retirement money to his mother, and left to pursue his comedic dreams.

 

With stints as a writer for actor/comedian George Lopez, Damon Wayans, and Saturday Night Live's Darryl Hammond, Preacher quickly built up his comedic reputation.

 

But being Muslim in Hollywood was no easy task, and Preacher was hard-pressed at times because he wouldn't write derogatory jokes about women or other topics that seemed anti-Muslim. And though his material was good, and though he was championed by Lopez and Hammond, Preacher decided to leave Hollywood and go the stand-up route.

 

He teamed up with comedians Azhar Usman and Azeem, and later Mo Amer, to form "Allah Made Me Funny" as an extension of the "Protest Islam" he grew up admiring. It was a way to be Muslim and put it out there on display, a way to keep protesting against boxing in of Muslims.


 
"He was shocked that I got physical, and he said to me, 'What kind of a Muslim are you?' I said, 'I'm new. I'm not that good yet.'"
 


"I want Muslims to get off the sidelines and start expressing themselves," Preacher says, "And not in a Muslim bubble."
 

When Preacher joined up the other comedians to make the "Allah Made Me Funny" comedy troupe, their mandate was "to be as good as their competitors, if not better."

And the reason was this: "Every time someone listened to us (and they were Muslim), they'd say, 'Listen, these guys have values. Either values that make me look at my own values or values that make me want to get out there and do it to.'"

 

And as popular as the comedy group is in the United States and other parts of the world, they still have trouble performing in Muslim countries like Saudi Arabia or Dubai.

 

"We're showing a new and different narrative on what it is to be Muslim," Preacher says, "and that can be hard to swallow in the countries where Islam began."

 

But that's what Preacher has always been about: Being public about his faith and pushing for a way for Muslims to be part of the system without giving up their values. And though he has now been a Muslim revert for over 20 years, it's still a learning process, he says.

 

He recalled a story back when he had first had taken the Shahadah, when a brother had come up to him and started insulting him: "He was in my face," Preacher says.

 

"He'd say, 'You're Muslim? What you gonna do?' I was trying to do the right thing, because I knew that if I got physical, then he would be getting a whooping for all the guys who I didn't give a whooping to in the first place. But he started up on the Prophet and then he started insulting my mother, and I put him down.

 

"He was shocked that I got physical, and he said to me, 'What kind of a Muslim are you?' I said, 'I'm new. I'm not that good yet.'"

 

Preacher still doesn't think he's that good yet, and he hopes to take retirement from the comedy business in a few years and focus more on his family and his faith.

 

"I want to learn Arabic. There's so much I want to read," he says. "But I'm always about the protest, and my protest now is for Muslims to own their faith."
 


Read more: http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1265811522232&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout#ixzz0gwsx3Ege

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Christ will never be proud to reject to be a slave to God ...( 4: 172 )



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